Friday, October 31, 2014

Happy Halloween!

There was a slight change of pace today with 67 new birds and 9 recaptures made up of 12 species.  Little flocks of Yellow-rumped Warblers kept us occupied for some of the morning with 35 of them being banded.  We also had a good number of Ruby-crowned Kinglets with 8 being banded and 1 recaptured making them the number two species banded today.   

Ruby-crowned Kinglet (after hatch year, male)

The forecast for tomorrow looks a little iffy at this point.  A cold front moving through overnight will bring cooler temperatures and strong wind.  The strong wind will likely limit the number of nets that we are able to open safely.         

NEW BIRDS
8 Ruby-crowned Kinglet
5 Hermit Thrush
7 Common Yellowthroat
1 Northern Parula
2 Palm Warbler (Western)
35 Yellow-rumped Warbler (Myrtle)
1 Eastern Towhee
5 Swamp Sparrow
3 Painted Bunting

RECAPTURES
1 Blue Jay
1 Carolina Chickadee
1 Ruby-crowned Kinglet
2 Gray Catbird
4 Yellow-rumped Warbler (Myrtle)

BANDING STATS
# of New Birds:  67
# of Recaptures:  9
# of Species:  12
Effort:  141.91 net-hours
Capture Rate:  53.6 birds/100 net-hours
# of Nets:  23

BANDING STAFF
Aaron Given
Matt Zak
William Oakley
Libby Natola
Mattie VandenBoom

Thursday, October 30, 2014

Returning Sharp-shinned Hawk

Slow day with only 17 new birds and 11 recaptures of 7 different species.  I was kind of expecting more birds today because of the cold front that moved through early this morning but the radar indicated most of the bird activity was to our west in Tennessee and Georgia.  Another cold front is approaching from the west which will bring with it much colder temperatures for the weekend.  Unfortunately for us, the winds for Saturday and Sunday are predicted to be 25-40 mph.

All of the Sharp-shinned Hawks that we have captured this season have been juveniles.  So when I removed an adult from the net this morning and saw that it was already wearing a band, I got excited. I recognized the prefix number and had a hunch that is was one that we had banded in previous years. I looked up the number when I got back to the office this afternoon and found that it was banded last year on 10/29/13.  Pretty good timing . . .  only one day later than last year!    

NEW BIRDS
1 Sharp-shinned Hawk
1 Orange-crowned Warbler
2 Common Yellowthroat
1 Black-throated Blue Warbler
9 Yellow-rumped Warbler
3 Swamp Sparrow

RECAPTURES
1 Sharp-shinned Hawk
5 Gray Catbird
4 Common Yellowthroat
1 Swamp Sparrow

BANDING STATS
# of New Birds:  17
# of Recaptures:  11
# of Species:  7
Effort:  120.7 net-hours
Capture Rate:  23.2 birds/100 net-hours
# of Nets:  23

BANDING STAFF
Aaron Given
Matt Zak
William Oakley
Libby Natola
Mattie VandenBoom

Wednesday, October 29, 2014

October 29, Late Ruby-throated Hummingbird

It was a somewhat slow morning around the banding station, we caught 25 new birds and 17 recaptures representing 13 species. We did not band any remarkable new species, but we did capture a Ruby-throated Hummingbird today. It was quite late in the season for hummingbirds, the most recent ruby-throat that we caught this season was on September 12th. We also caught another Orange-crowned Warbler, bringing our total for this season up to four. 

Hatch Year Female Orange-crowned Warbler


NEW BIRDS
1 Red-eyed Vireo
1 Gray Catbird
1 Orange-crowned Warbler
4 Common Yellowthroat
3 Western Palm Warbler
11 Yellow-rumped Warbler
4 Swamp Sparrow

RECAPTURES
1 Tufted Titmouse
1 House Wren
1 Hermit Thrush
7 Gray Catbird
1 Common Yellowthroat
3 Yellow-rumped Warbler
1 Song Sparrow
1 Northern Cardinal
1 Indigo Bunting

BANDING STATS
# of New Birds: 25
# of Recaptures: 17
# of Species: 13
Effort: 126.5 net-hours
Capture Rate: 33.2 birds/100 net hours
# of Nets: 23

BANDING STAFF
Aaron Given
Mattie VandenBoom
William Oakley 
Libby Natola
Matt Zak

Tuesday, October 28, 2014

Slow Day But Had Some Returns

It was a very slow at the banding station today with only 22 new birds and 20 recaptures of 15 different species.  Last night's radar images for coastal South Carolina showed a good deal of bird movement, however there was very little activity in states north of us.  The large numbers of birds that arrived yesterday morning left last night, and there was nothing to replace them.  Southerly winds and warm temperatures for tonight and tomorrow will likely result in another slow day tomorrow.  But . . . beginning Thursday temperatures are going to start dropping as a major low pressure system moves into our area bringing with it northerly winds, and some of the coldest nights that we have had yet this fall.  And I'm sure there will be loads of Yellow-rumped Warblers coming with it too!

This is the time of year when we start to get some wintering birds returning to KIBS.  And today we had a few.

1.  Yellow-rumped Warbler #2720-51082 - originally banded on 11/10/13 with no previous recaptures.

2.  Yellow-rumped Warbler #2720-51206 - originally banded on 11/17/13 with not previous recaptures.

3.  Yellow-rumped Warbler #2340-121329 - originally banded on 11/25/11.  This bird has been recaptured several time over the past 4 years (11/10/12, 2/5/13, 3/20/13, 11/28/13, 2/20/14).  

4.  Blue Jay #1713-09744 - originally banded on 10-17-13 with no previous recaptures.

NEW BIRDS
1 House Wren
1 Hermit Thrush
4 Gray Catbird
1 Orange-crowned Warbler
4 Common Yellowthroat
1 Northern Parula
1 Palm Warbler (Western)
6 Yellow-rumped Warbler (Myrtle)
1 Swamp Sparrow
2 Indigo Bunting

RECAPTURES
1 Blue Jay
1 House Wren
1 Carolina Wren
8 Gray Catbird
1 Common Yellowthroat
3 Yellow-rumped Warbler (Myrtle)
1 Eastern Towhee
2 Swamp Sparrow
1 Northern Cardinal
1 Painted Bunting

BANDING STATS
# of New Birds:  22
# of Recaptures: 20
# of Species:  15
Effort:  136.5 net-hours
Capture Rate:  30.8 birds/100 net-hours
# of Nets:  23

BANDING STAFF
Aaron Given
Mattie VandenBoom
William Oakley
Libby Natola
Matt Zak    

Monday, October 27, 2014

1000th Gray Catbird

The early morning fog certainly did not deter the wave of Yellow-rumped Warblers that we banded today. A total of 134 birds were banded, 91 of which were Yellow-rumped Warblers. Today also marked a milestone for this year, as we banded our 1000th Gray Catbird. Our first Catbird for the season was caught on September 18th, which was also the day we banded our 1000th bird. 

NEW BIRDS
1 Sharp-shinned Hawk
5 Ruby-crowned Kinglet
1 Gray-cheeked Thrush
4 Hermit Thrush
6 Gray Catbird
1 Black-and-white Warbler
15 Common Yellowthroat
1 American Redstart
1 Palm Warbler (Western)
91 Yellow-rumped Warbler (Myrtle)
6 Swamp Sparrow
1 Indigo Bunting
1 Painted Bunting

RECAPTURES
1 Downy Woodpecker
1 Carolina Chickadee
1 Carolina Wren
2 Brown Thrasher
10 Gray Catbird
1 Eastern Towhee
1 Swamp Sparrow
1 Northern Cardinal
1 Painted Bunting

BANDING STATS
# of New Birds:  134
# of Recaptures:  19
Effort:  126.5 net-hours
Capture Rate:  120.5 birds/100 net-hours
# of Nets:  23

BANDING STAFF
Aaron Given
Mattie VandenBoom
Libby Natola
Matt Zak    
William Oakley

Sunday, October 26, 2014

4000th Bird of the Season Banded Today

We had another decent day of banding with 70 new birds and 18 recaptures of 14 species.  It started out with a flurry of birds, and quickly turned into a trickle by 9:30am.  That's usually how it goes this time of year.  We get large flocks of Yellow-rumped Warblers early in the morning, they move through, and then they are gone.  Later in November when the the Yellow-rumps have presumably "settled-in" for the winter, we can catch large flocks throughout the entire day.

On a side note, we banded our 4000th bird of the season today!  Last year we didn't hit that mark until November 3rd and not until November 8th in 2012.
 

NEW BIRDS
1 Sharp-shinned Hawk
1 Eastern Phoebe
3 House Wren
3 Ruby-crowned Kinglet
1 Hermit Thrush
7 Gray Catbird
1 Brown Thrasher
6 Common Yellowthroat
39 Yellow-rumped Warbler (Myrtle)
1 Eastern Towhee
1 Song Sparrow
6 Swamp Sparrow

RECAPTURES
1 Sharp-shinned Hawk
1 Carolina Wren
1 House Wren
12 Gray Catbird
1 Eastern Towhee
1 Song Sparrow
1 Northern Cardinal

BANDING STATS
# of New Birds:  70
# of Recaptures:  18
Effort:  128.8 net-hours
Capture Rate:  68.3 birds/100 net-hours
# of Nets:  23

BANDING STAFF
Aaron Given
Mattie VandenBoom
Libby Natola
Matt Zak    

Saturday, October 25, 2014

October 25, the Yellow-rumped Warblers Arrive

Today we had 110 new birds, and 13 recaptures for a total of 123 birds spanning 11 species. Only 10% (11 birds) of our new birds today were Gray Catbirds, compared to 53% one week ago, on Saturday, October 18th. As the number of new Catbirds dwindles, a new species has arrived to replace them. The 75 Yellow-rumped warblers we captured constituted 68% of our new birds today. This is a sign of things to come, as we expect the number of yellow-rumped warblers to keep increasing as we band into November. We banded 1054 yellow-rumps in the fall of 2013, and 1060 in 2012, so it is reasonable to expect that these birds are likely to keep us busy for the next several weeks. 


Yellow-rumped Warbler

NEW BIRDS
2 House Wren
3 Ruby-crowned Kinglet
3 Hermit Thrush
11 Gray Catbird
1 Northern Waterthrush
7 Common Yellowthroat
2 Palm Warbler (Western)
75 Yellow-rumped Warbler (Myrtle)
3 Song Sparrow
2 Swamp Sparrow
1 Northern Cardinal

RECAPTURES
9 Gray Catbird
3 Common Yellowthroat
1 Swamp Sparrow

BANDING STATS
# of New Birds: 110
# of Recaptures: 13
# of Species: 11
Effort: 126.5 net hours
Capture Rate: 97.2 birds/100 het-hours
# of Nets: 23

BANDING STAFF
Mattie VandenBoom
William Oakley
Matt Zak
Libby Natola

Friday, October 24, 2014

FOS: Sharp-shinned Hawk

Today was a much better day with 97 new birds and 23 recaptures made up of 19 species.  The Yellow-rumped Warbler made its first big appearance at the station with 48 of them being banded today.  We had our first two Sharp-shinned Hawks of the season.  We had both a male and a female Sharp-shinned Hawk.  Most of the sharpies we band at KIBS are males which is likely due to the size difference between males and females.  In raptors, males can be significantly smaller than females.  This size difference can mean the difference of actually getting snagged in a mist net or just bouncing out.  The size difference also allows us to determine sex with just a wing measurement.  The female’s wing was 32mm longer than her male counterpart. 
  
Sharp-shinned Hawk (hatch year, female)
        
NEW BIRDS
2 Sharp-shinned Hawk
2 Eastern Phoebe
2 House Wren
1 Golden-crowned Kinglet
7 Ruby-crowned Kinglet
2 Swainson’s Thrush
2 Hermit Thrush
12 Gray Catbird
1 Tennessee Warbler
5 Common Yellowthroat
1 Black-throated Warbler
6 Palm Warbler (Western)
48 Yellow-rumped Warbler (Myrtle)
1 Song Sparrow
5 Swamp Sparrow

RECAPTURES
1 Eastern Screech-Owl
1 Eastern Phoebe
1 House Wren
1 Carolina Wren
1 Ruby-crowned Kinglet
13 Gray Catbird
2 Common Yellowthroat
2 Northern Cardinal
1 Painted Bunting

BANDING STATS
# of New Birds:  97
# of Recaptures:  23
# of Species:  19
Effort:  143.75 net-hours
Capture Rate:  83.5 birds/100 net-hours
# of Nets:  23

BANDING STAFF
Aaron Given
Mattie VandenBoom
Matt Zak
William Oakley
    

Thursday, October 23, 2014

October 23, 2014

Today was similar to the last few days with only 41 new birds and 22 recaptures made up of 16 species.  We expect the next few days to be similar as well.  Currently we are in a transition period between high volume species.  We are reaching the end of the Gray Catbird migration and have likely seen the last of big catbird days.  However, we will continue to catch catbirds throughout November which will hopefully bring us over the 1,000 mark for them.  Also we have not been inundated with Yellow-rumped Warblers yet.  We will likely see a big push of yellow-rumps within the next week or so.  Today was made special by the recapture of two birds banded in a previous year.  One of them was a Gray Catbird that was originally banded on 10/16/13 and the other was a Swamp Sparrow that was originally banded on 11/18/12.        

NEW BIRDS
1 Yellow-billed Cuckoo
4 Ruby-crowned Kinglet
1 Gray-cheeked Thrush
1 Hermit Thrush
13 Gray Catbird
1 Orange-crowned Warbler
9 Common Yellowthroat
2 Palm Warbler (Western)
3 Yellow-rumped Warbler (Myrtle)
1 Eastern Towhee
3 Swamp Sparrow
1 Painted Bunting

RECAPTURES
1 Downey Woodpecker
1 House Wren
15 Gray Catbird
1 Black and White Warbler
2 Common Yellowthroat
1 Prairie Warbler
1 Swamp Sparrow

BANDING STATS
# of New Birds:  41
# of Recaptures:  22
# of Species:  16
Effort:  131.1 net-hours
Capture Rate:  48.1 birds/100 net-hours
# of Nets:  23

BANDING STAFF
Aaron Given
Mattie VandenBoom
Libby Natola
Matt Zak
William Oakley

Wednesday, October 22, 2014

22 October 2014

Gusty winds kept our numbers down with only 47 new birds and 19 recaptures. However, we did have a decent amount of diversity with 17 different species. In addition to the high species diversity, we also had a large amount of movement in the skies above our nets. Throughout the day we observed a large kettles of Turkey Vultures migrating south as well as a large flock of Tree Swallows.  Unfortunately, none of the Tree Swallows found their way into our nets, but we are still optimistic.

NEW BIRDS
1 Yellow-billed Cuckoo
4 Eastern Phoebe
1 Red-eyed Vireo
1 Hermit Thrush
21 Gray Catbird
1 Ovenbird
3 Common Yellowthroat
1 Magnolia Warbler
1 Blackpoll Warbler
2 Black-throated Blue Warbler
4 Palm Warbler (Western)
5 Yellow-rumped Warbler (Myrtle)
1 Eastern Towhee
1 Swamp Sparrow
1 Painted Bunting

RECAPTURES
1 Carolina Chickadee
13 Gray Catbird
3 Common Yellowthroat
1 Northern Cardinal
1 Swamp Sparrow

BANDING STATS
# of New Birds:  47
# of Recaptures:  19
# of Species:  20
Effort:  119.0 net-hours
Capture Rate:  55.5 birds/100 net-hours
# of Nets:  23

BANDING STAFF
Aaron Given
Mattie VandenBoom
Libby Natola
Matt Zak
William Oakley

Tuesday, October 21, 2014

New Species for the Banding Station

We had 58 birds today from 9 species, 41 of which were new and 17 which were recaptures. While this seemed slow in comparison to the past few days, we were not without excitement. Our bird of the day was a clapper rail, our first caught at the station! Clapper rails are found in saltmarshes and mangrove along the east coast and west coast, and as far south as Brazil. Though we are near a marsh, we were very surprised to find one as far upland as our nets. Here is a video of the rail's release. The banders in this video are yelling "Up" to the rail because it flew unexpectedly and headed directly for another net. 
video




Clapper Rail (hatch-year, sex unknown)


NEW BIRDS
1 Clapper Rail
33 Gray Catbird
2 Common Yellowthroat
1 Western Palm Warbler
2 Swamp Sparrow
1 Indigo Bunting
1 Painted Bunting

RECAPTURES
1 White Eyed Vireo
1 House Wren
10 Gray Catbird
2 Common Yellowthroat
1 Yellow-rumped Warbler
1 Swamp Sparrow
1 Painted Bunting

BANDING STATS
# of New Birds: 41
# of Recaptures: 17
# of Species: 9
Effort: 130.18
Capture Rate: 44.55
# of Nets: 23

BANDING STAFF
Aaron Given
Mattie VandenBoom
William Oakley
Libby Natola

Monday, October 20, 2014

Indigo Bunting Molt and FOS White-throated Sparrow

Another productive day of banding with 128 new birds and 19 recaptures of 17 different species. The Gray Catbird migration has been impressive this fall.  We banded another 74 of them today giving us a total of 899 for the season so far and we will continue to catch new ones all the way through the end of November.  But the highlight of the day was our first White-throated Sparrow of the season!

We have been banding a bunch of Indigo Buntings lately so I thought it would be a good time to explain how we age and sex them.  Hatch-year Indigo Buntings (and Painted Buntings) have a somewhat complex molt strategy.  Their first prebasic molt starts almost immediately after they leave the nest.  This molt consists of most or all of the body feathers and some wing feathers including lesser and median coverts but not the greater coverts, primary coverts, secondaries, and primaries.  The resulting plumage is almost identical to the juvenal plumage and males and females look the same at this point.  Later in the fall or winter, they undergo an extra molt (presupplemental molt) in which they replace the body feathers again along with more wing feathers including the lesser coverts, median coverts, greater coverts.  In addition the outer 3-5 primaries and inner 3-4 secondaries are also replaced showing eccentric molt pattern.  The resulting plumage is usually a little brighter than the previous plumage, and males and females still look similar.  However, we should now be able to separate most males from females based on the amount of blue in the wing.

The photo below shows the wing of an hatch-year Indigo Bunting in its 1st basic plumage.  Note that no greater coverts, primary coverts, secondaries, and primaries have been replaced.  The unreplaced feathers are the same feathers that were grown in when the bird was in the nest.  Males and females are indistinguishable when in this plumage.  

Indigo Bunting (hatch-year, sex unknown)
The next two photos show examples of birds that has already undergone their presupplemental molt exhibiting an eccentric molt pattern with some outer primaries and inner secondaries being replaced.  They also has replaced their greater coverts which when compared to the greater coverts in the photo above are darker and have much wider and browner edging to them.  This first individual is probably a female based on the minimal amount of blue in the lesser, median, and greater coverts.  The second is a male because it has a substantial amount of blue in the lesser and median coverts (trust me - my finger is covering most of it up), and some blue in the greater coverts.      
Indigo Bunting (hatch-year, probably female)

Indigo Bunting (hatch-year, male)

Adults do not undergo a presupplemental molt and will replace all of their feathers once in late summer during its prebasic molt.  Adult females will look similar to hatch-year males and females except that the replaced primary coverts, primaries, and secondaries will be darker and have a slight blueish edging to them.

Indigo Bunting (after hatch-year, female)
 Adult males will have a lot of blue in the lesser and median coverts and all/most of the greater coverts, primaries coverts, primaries, and secondaries will have bright blue edging.

Indigo Bunting (after hatch-year, male)
              

NEW BIRDS
1 Eastern Phoebe
1 Ruby-crowned Kinglet
74 Gray Catbird
1 Black-and-White Warbler
22 Common Yellowthroat
1 American Redstart
1 Northern Parula
2 Black-throated Blue Warbler
3 Palm Warbler (Western)
16 Yellow-rumped Warbler (Myrtle)
1 Swamp Sparrow
1 White-throated Sparrow
3 Indigo Bunting
1 Painted Bunting

RECAPTURES
1 White-eyed Vireo
1 House Wren
13 Gray Catbird
1 Black-and-White Warbler
2 Common Yellowthroat
1 Eastern Towhee

BANDING STATS
# of New Birds:  128
# of Recaptures:  19
# of Species:  17
Effort:  133.4 net-hours
Capture Rate:  110.2 birds/100 net-hours
# of Nets:  23

BANDING STAFF
Aaron Given
Mattie VandenBoom
Libby Natola
Matt Zak
William Oakley

Sunday, October 19, 2014

FOS: Blue-headed Vireo, Golden-crowned Kinglet, and Song Sparrow

We banded 102 new birds and 24 recaptures of 22 different species.  With chilly temperatures and a stiff north wind last night, I thought we would have done much better than we did.  The gusty winds continued throughout the morning which may have affected our numbers a bit as the birds were able to see the nets and avoid them.  Despite the winds, we did catch three more first-of-the-seasons:  Blue-headed Vireo, Golden-crowned Kinglet, and Song Sparrow.  This can be an exciting time during fall migration because there is still a nice mix of neotropical migrants passing through and "our" winter species are starting to show up.

Blue-headed Vireo (Hatch-year, sex unknown)

NEW BIRDS
1 Yellow-bellied Sapsucker
3 Eastern Phoebe
2 White-eyed Vireo
1 Blue-headed Vireo
3 Red-eyed Vireo
1 House Wren
1 Golden-crowned Kinglet
1 Ruby-crowned Kinglet
1 Swainson's Thrush
4 Hermit Thrush
37 Gray Catbird
22 Common Yellowthroat
1 American Redstart
2 Northern Parula
7 Palm Warbler (Western)
1 Yellow-rumped Warbler (Myrtle)
1 Song Sparrow
5 Swamp Sparrow
8 Indigo Bunting

RECAPTURES
1 White-eyed Vireo
16 Gray Catbird
1 Northern Mockingbird
1 Common Yellowthroat
1 Northern Cardinal
1 Indigo Bunting
3 Painted Bunting

BANDING STATS
# of New Birds:  102
# of Recaptures:  24
# of Species:  22
Effort:  118.4 net-hours
Capture Rate:  106.4 birds/100 net-hours
# of Nets:  23

BANDING STAFF
Aaron Given
Mattie VandenBoom
William Oakley
Libby Natola
Matt Zak
Matt Johnson


Saturday, October 18, 2014

First Ever Rose-breasted Grosbeak!

Today was another good day at KIBS with a total of 70 new birds and 29 recaptures of 15 species. The surprise of the day came late in the morning when a Rose-breasted Grosbeak was captured.  Rose-breasted Grosbeaks are fairly rare on Kiawah Island during spring and fall migration.  This was the first Rose-breasted Grosbeak ever banded at KIBS!  Last fall, one was seen around the banding station but it eluded our nets.

Rose-breasted Grosbeak (hatch year, male)


NEW BIRDS
1 Yellow-billed Cuckoo
1 Yellow-bellied Sapsucker
1 Tufted Titmouse
1 White-eyed Vireo
1 Swainson's Thrush 
37 Gray Catbird 
10 Common Yellowthroat 
2 American Redstart
13 Palm Warbler (Western)
1 Northern Cardinal 
1 Rose-breasted Grosbeak
8 Indigo Bunting
5 Painted Bunting

RECAPTURES
2 Common Ground-Dove 
2 White-eyed Vireo 
1 House Wren 
22 Gray Catbird 
1 Common Yellowthroat
1 Painted Bunting

BANDING STATS 
# of New Birds: 70 
# of Recaptures: 29 
# of Species: 15
Effort: 131.84 net-hours 
Capture Rate: 75.1 birds/100 net hours 
# of Nets: 23 

BANDING STAFF 
Aaron Given 
Mattie VandenBoom 
Matt Zak 
William Oakley 
Libby Natola

Friday, October 17, 2014

Five First of the Seasons!


It was a busy day at the banding station with a 194 new birds banded and 22 birds recaptured made up of 29 species!  North West winds along the east coast last night made conditions ideal for migration into our area.  The highlights of our day included five First of the Seasons.      

To start off are First of the Seasons we had a pair of Yellow-bellied Sapsuckers.  The pair was comprised of a hatch year male and a second year female.  Sapsuckers can be sexed based of the color of their throats.  Males will have at least a few red feathers on the throat whereas females will have an all-white throat.
Yellow-bellied Sapsucker (hatch year male and second year female)

Our next First of the Season was a Hermit Thrush.  We are now up to five species of thrushes for the season including Veery, Swainson ’s Thrush, Gray-cheeked Thrush, Hermit Thrush and Wood Thrush.  
Hermit Thrush (hatch year)

We also had our first Ruby-crowned Kinglet of season.  This is one of our latest dates for a first of the Season Ruby-crowned Kinglet.  For the last two years, kinglets have shown up during the last week of September but their migration does not usually peak until the end of October. 

The last two First of the Seasons were species of warblers.  The first was an Orange-crowned Warbler.  The individual we had was a hatch year female, who lacked any orange in her crown.  The next species was our good old feathered friend, the Yellow-rumped Warbler.  Over the next couple weeks, yellow-rumps will begin to flood the area and we will likely band close to thousand if not more of them by the end of the season.      
Orange-crowned Warbler (hatch year, female)
       

NEW BIRDS
1 Common Ground-Dove
1 Yellow-billed Cuckoo
2 Yellow-bellied Sapsucker
1 Eastern Phoebe
2 White-eyed Vireo
2 Red-eyed Vireo  
2 House Wren
1 Ruby-crowned Kinglet
1 Gray-cheeked Thrush 
3 Swainson's Thrush 
1 Hermit Thrush 
96 Gray Catbird 
1 Brown Thrasher 
2 Black and White Warbler 
2 Tennessee Warbler 
1 Orange-crowned Warbler 
30 Common Yellowthroat 
7 American Redstart
1 Cape May Warbler 
2 Northern Parula 
3 Magnolia Warbler
8 Black-throated Blue Warbler 
13 Western Palm Warbler
1 Yellow-rumped Warbler 
1 Prairie Warbler 
1 Scarlet Tanager 
1 Northern Cardinal 
6 Indigo Bunting
1 Painted Bunting

RECAPTURES
1 Common Ground-Dove 
1 White-eyed Vireo 
1 House Wren 
15 Gray Catbird 
4 Northern Cardinal

BANDING STATS 
# of New Birds: 194 
# of Recaptures: 22 
# of Species: 29 
Effort: 170.2 net-hours 
Capture Rate: 126.6 birds/100 net hours 
# of Nets: 23 

BANDING STAFF 
Aaron Given 
Mattie VandenBoom 
Matt Zak 
William Oakley 
Libby Natola